Education Policy Fellowship Program

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Education Policy Fellowship Program


While in Washington DC last April for the annual Institute for Educational Leadership’s National Policy Seminar, the Georgia Fellows were able to visit the offices of Senator Johnny Isakson and Congressman John Lewis.  Here, Congressman Lewis spends a few moments with his visitors before returning to the House chamber for an important vote.

What is EPFP?

The Education Policy Fellowship Program (EPFP) is a national professional development program sponsored by the Institute for Educational Leadership (IEL) that provides potential leaders with the knowledge and networks to advance the core issues of education policy. Each participating state has autonomy over its program.

It is an initiative of the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education and is co-sponsored by the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University and the Office of the Vice President for Public Service and Outreach at the University of Georgia. The program connects potential educational leaders with one another to build the capacity for our state to raise the bar for student learning and achievement.

The program addresses the need for an education leadership development program in the state to provide potential leaders with the knowledge and networks to advance the core issues of education policy. It serves as a critical resource for individuals, organizations and the state to increase the knowledge about education policy and linkages between policy and practice. Ultimately EPEP seeks to improve the chances of children and youth to succeed. 

What is the value of the program?

Here are two recent graduates - Brian Pauling and Mike Carnathan - who talk about the value and impact of the program both professionally and personally.

Here's more from 2015 Fellows Pat Falotico, Robert Gaines, Amy Foust and Angela Hurtado. They explain in this short video the impact they feel the program makes, why they chose to participate and why others with an interest in education policy in Georgia should apply.

The Class of 2017

The newest cohort recently concluded its strategic retreat which formally opens the  Class of 2017.  The first Colloquium will be held in October.

Class of 2016 Colloquium Topics:

  • Moving Forward: Education and Workforce Readiness.  
  • National Washington Policy Seminar
  • High Performing & Effective Schools: What Do They Look Like? How Do We Create Them?" 
  • Preparing our Students for a "Flattening' World"
  • Critical Linkages to Education:  The Connections and Intersections of Policy Sectors.
  • Neighborhood Planning: How Housing Policy Influences Child Outcomes
  • Effective Student Discipline: Keeping Kids in Class
  • School Funding and Finance: Following the Money Stream
  • Toward a Better Understanding of Policymaking
  • The Impact of Changing Demographics on Georgia's Education System 
  • A New Majority - Impacts in the South and Across the Nation. The Five Georgias:  What Policymakers Need to Know

More About EPFP

What are the Requirements?

The Fellows commit nine months and concentrate on three program strands: public policy, leadership, and professional networking. They remain in their full-time positions and use their work environment as the context for examining important leadership and policy issues in Georgia.

What are the Personal Benefits?

The program provides Fellows with a unique personal development laboratory for applying new insights and for cultivating new skills. The participants will hear and discuss education policy with the most respected policy makers in the state and nation. At the end of a year, EPFP Fellows will be better informed, more skillful advocates for sound public policy.

What are the Benefits to Georgia?

With the implementation of the EPFP, the Georgia Partnership, the Andrew Young School of Public Policy, and the Office of the President for Public Service and Outreach at the University of Georgia cultivate strategic leaders who have the capacity to advocate for and create sound public policy to improve public education. Ultimately, EPFP seeks to improve the chances of children and youth to succeed.

Need more information?  Contact.